Beekeeping and Honey Extraction Center for Tanzania

Beekeeping and Honey Extraction Center for Tanzania

Architecte
Jaklitsch Gardner Architects
Lieu
Tanzania
Catégorie
Centres culturels

Beekeeping and Honey Extraction Center for Tanzania

Jaklitsch Gardner Architects en tant que Architectes.

The design of the sanctuary fosters a sense of community, collaboration, and improvement through informal and formal spaces for interaction. The facilities are organized in a cellular-patterned structure around garden courts providing a framework for future expansion, as well as spaces for informal interaction and learning. Construction is being divided into three core phases; phase one will include spaces for education, honey harvesting and a market. The building will use sustainable and locally sourced materials and labor. The structural components include mud-fired bricks, which are being made on site; they create a structure that appears to grow out of the landscape. The custom brick bond is dimensional, textural, and interwoven, recalling local weaving traditions. The varied arrangements are dictated by the programmatic necessities within each structure to maximize ventilation. The metal roof design accommodates water catchment and is slightly elevated above the enclosed areas to allow for passive ventilation and air circulation. The building form is intended to be flexible and account for expansion of the enterprise and need – as the enterprise grows the building form follows that growth.


The construction of this project signifies an important initiative that promotes a form of economic growth that maintains and honors Tanzania’s rich beekeeping history in harmony with wildlife and land conservation practices. “Our shared vision is that the design of this building will bring a sense of dignity to the enterprise - a place where modern equipment and techniques blend with traditional methods. An increase in beekeeping education programs offers local farmers and tribal groups the knowledge and skills to become more independent and self-reliant, providing an opportunity to improve their quality of life,” say Mark Gardner, who is leading the design as principal of Jaklitsch/Gardner Architects. Stephan Jaklitsch’s personal interest and research as an urban beekeeper has served in furthering the understanding and addressing the unique needs of the project. The facility will be designed to comply with United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and European Union (EU) guidelines for global distribution; the profits generated will return to the Asali and Nyuki sanctuary to encourage local learning, conservation and eco-tourism.

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